Terpenes: The flavour and smell of your cannabis


 

A Cannabis Bud Lays On A Purple Flower

 

What are Terpenes and What do they do?

For many people, the word “terpene” is a strange and unfamiliar term, but it won’t be for much longer.

As science and technology carry us to better understandings of cannabis, we’re beginning to see that there’s a lot more to marijuana than its cannabinoid content. To get a hint of the other therapeutic compounds in your strain, just give it a sniff.

 

Fragrant Oils

Terpenes are fragrant oils produced by a variety of plants, and often have a strong odor that may protect the plants that produce them by deterring herbivores and by attracting predators and parasites of herbivores.

They give cannabis its aromatic diversity. Terpenes are what gives the flower its signature smells and shatter its unique flavors. These oils are secreted in the flower’s sticky resin glands, the same ones that produce THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids.

Over 100 different terpenes have been identified in the cannabis plant, and every strain tends toward a unique terpene type and composition. In other words, a strain like Cheese and its descendants will likely have a discernible cheese-like smell, and Blueberry offspring often inherit the smell of berries.

 

Most Common Cannabis Terpenes

 

Alpha-Pinene, Beta-Pinene

Aroma: Pine

Effects: Alertness, memory retention, counteracts some THC effects

Medical Value: Asthma, antiseptic

Also Found In: Pine needles, rosemary, basil, parsley, dill

 

Myrcene

Aroma: Musky, cloves, earthyherbal with notes of citrus and tropical fruit

Effects: Sedating “couchlock” effect, relaxing

Medical Value: Antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic; good for muscle tensionsleeplessnesspaininflammationdepression

Also Found In: Mango, lemongrass, thyme, hops

 

Limonene

Aroma: Citrus

Effects: Elevated moodstress relief

Medical Value: Antifungal, anti-bacterial, anti-carcinogenic, dissolves gallstones, mood-enhancer; may treat gastrointestinal complications, heartburn, depression

Also Found In: Fruit rinds, rosemary, juniper, peppermint

 

Caryophyllene

Aroma: Pepperspicywoody, cloves

Medical Value: Gastroprotectiveanti-inflammatory; good for arthritisulcersautoimmune disorders, and other gastrointestinal complications

Also Found In: Black pepper, cloves, cotton

 

 

Conclusion

Like cannabinoids, terpenes bind to receptors in the brain and give rise to various effects. When choosing a strain based on its terpene content, keep in mind that different harvests may demonstrate dramatically different terpenoid profiles due to variances in growing and curing techniques.

Lastly, when choosing your method of ingestion, keep in mind that the beneficial qualities of terpenes can be seriously damaged if heated past their boiling point. It is best to try a ‘low-heat’ device such as a Vaporizer pen to extract the full benefit and flavor of your terpenes.

For the full article and more info check out Leafly!